SCRUBS!

Scrubs was created by Bill Lawrence back in 2001 and broadcast on NBC. The show has long since lived on my television. I welcomed the sixth season with as much anticipation as any other thus far.

I have to admit; once George Clooney left the cast of ER back in 1999, I vowed I would never to watch another “hospital” related series. However, Scrubs takes on a completely different approach to work and life in a hospital setting with a comical twist.

Scrubs, is somewhat like the series ER, with the fast paced medical crisis and deeper hidden meanings of life. Mixed with a dash of the Seinfeld magic (four main characters which all have equal roles in each episode) and you have one very brilliant program.

The writing isn’t packed with medical jargon or overly dramatic scenes. Instead the lines are peppered with cunning sarcasm and steadfast wit. The writing is what makes the show unlike anything else out there these days. The story lines, the acting, the ever so perfect sound track, all good reasons as to why this sitcom has outlasted so many others over the past five years that have fallen short and to the wayside.

The lead character, Dr. John Dorian, “J.D.”, played by (none other than) Zack Braff, provides the viewer with his inner monologue during each episode. The seamless integration of reality and fantasy scenes are impeccable. J.D. embarks upon his forever battle to win the respect from his superior Dr. Percival “Perry” Cox, played by John C. McGinley. The never ending longing for approval and sheer nuisance of J.D’s desperate need to bond like father and son with Dr. Cox, gives way for multiple scenes in which Dr. Cox seems to get off degrading J.D. with the constant use of different female nicknames such as Vivian or Fiona. To quote Dr. Cox, “Back off Tiny Dancer, I have work to do.” Berating, all in the name of mentor.

The show becomes even funnier when it is complimented by J.D.’s ‘man-love’ for his best friend, the surgeon, Dr. Christopher Duncan “Turk”, played by Donald Faison. J.D. and Turk have an onscreen friendship that leaves you wondering, scratch that, knowing, they must be having a great time while filming. They make you want to drink apple martinis and get to know them in real life.

You add one gangly, neurotic, basket case, smarty, (and hottie) Dr. Elliot Reed, played by Sarah Chalke, a woman everyone can relate to. Every woman has been an ‘Elliot Reed’ in one situation or another. Lest not forget to mention Sarah Chalke has a gift for the scenes that require some pretty crafty physical comedy as well.

Top that with the gossipy, know what’s best for everyone else, can’t take her own advice, heart of gold, Nurse Carla Espinosa, played by Judy Reyes. Nurse Carla Espinosa is married (on Scrubs) to surgeon Dr Turk, aka “Dr. Turkleton”

One of the key characters in the show has to be the Janitor, played by Neil Flynn. The Janitor is the arch nemesis to J.D. Only, J.D. doesn’t know the exact nature of the Janitor’s hatred, even though it is apparent the Janitor is out to get J.D. at every turn. He may not be a lead character, but the series would not be complete without our “jumpsuit.”

The all mighty head of Sacred Heart Hospital, Dr. Bob Kelso, played by Ken Jenkins. The best way to summarize Dr. Bob Kelso is to quote him. “What has two thumbs and doesn’t give a crap? Bob Kelso, Nice to meet you.”

For the hospital’s legal department you have a mid 40 year old, spineless, still living at home with his mother, incapable of confrontation without passing out unconscious, Ted Buckland, played by Sam Lloyd

Last but certainly not least you have a possibly gay? Possibly straight? Always inappropriate, high “5” obsessed, surgeon Todd Quinlan, played by Robert Maschio

I look forward to every single new episode. I own all of the previous seasons on DVD. The sound tracks are downloaded in my ITUNES. I watch Scrubs via syndication on Comedy Central. If you aren’t watching Scrubs, you are seriously missing out on some of the best television program to come along!

What are some of you favorite lines in the show? Feel free to quote the characters in the comments!

 


Via Wikipedia

Scrubs, produced by the television production division of Disney–ABC Television Group, premiered on October 2, 2001, on NBC. The series received a Peabody Award in 2006. During the seventh season, NBC announced that it would not renew the show. ABC announced it had picked up the eighth season of the series, which began January 6, 2009. The ninth season premiered on December 1, 2009. On May 14, 2010, ABC cancelled the series.

On May 14, 2010, it was officially announced that the show was canceled. The season nine finale, titled “Our Thanks”, aired March 17, 2010. Five days later, on March 22, 2010, Zach Braff announced, via the official Facebook page, that the ninth season of Scrubs would be the last, commenting that, “Many of you have asked, so here it is: it appears that ‘New Scrubs’, ‘Scrubs 2.0’, ‘Scrubs with New Kids’, ‘Scrubbier’, ‘Scrubs without JD’ is no more. It was worth a try, but alas… it didn’t work.”[45][46]

Zach Braff, Sarah Chalke, Judy Reyes, John C. McGinley and Neil Flynn reprised their roles as J.D., Elliot Reid, Carla Espinosa, Perry Cox, and the Janitor to make a cameo appearances in the 2003 Muppets film It’s a Very Merry Muppet Christmas Movie, trying to reanimate Miss Piggy. Eventually, Piggy and the Scrubs cast break the fourth wall, with the actors portraying themselves and Bill Lawrence appearing as himself/the director of the current episode.

Sam Lloyd reprised his role as Ted Buckland in the season two finale of the Lawrence series Cougar Town. In the episode, written and directed by Lawrence, Ted is in Hawaii and says his girlfriend, Stephanie Gooch, has run off with Dr. Hooch.[47] Lloyd reprised his role again in a season three episode which also featured Ken Jenkins, Robert Maschio, Zach Braff, Christa Miller, Sarah Chalke and the Worthless Peons in cameo appearances at the end of the episode.

17 thoughts on “SCRUBS!

  1. I’m a recent Scrubs-lover and this revue explains why the show is so compelling. The quirky characters are always so interesting that the plot is often secondary. At least, that’s what I see. Great revue!

  2. J.D.: Ooh, Dr. Cox, can I ask you something?
    Dr. Cox: The answer is yes, it was me who saw you doing leg lifts in the gym on that inflatable ball. It was quite the display of girl power.

    Dr. Cox: You know, Bob, I’ve been thinking of all the times you manipulated me and toyed with me and I can’t help but recall that children’s fable about that race between the tortoise and the pain-in-the-ass-chief-of-medicine-that-everybody-hates. You see, Bob, the pain-in-the-ass-chief-of-medicine-that-everybody-hates kept running out in front of the tortoise and taunting him, but right at the end… oh, gosh I’m sure you remember what happened Bob, the tortoise bit clean through the Chief of Medicine’s calf muscle, dragged him to the ground, where he and all the other turtles devoured him alive right there on the racetrack. It’s a disturbing children’s book, Bob, I know, but it’s one that stuck with me nonetheless.

    Dr. Cox: Lassie, in response to the bestiality rumors circulating about you, I have decided to forgo calling you by the usual girl’s name, and instead I am going to refer to you as whatever famous dog I can think of. I have gone with Lassie because of course it satisfies the criteria of being both a girl’s and a dog’s name, thus helping you to ease into the transition

    [a woman with her son comes over to Dr. Cox and Jordan and starts talking to their son, Jack]
    Woman: Hi, cutie! Since you have so many balls, and too many toys can be overstimulating for an infant, Brantley here was wondering if he could borrow one to play with.
    Dr. Cox: Oh, that’s funny, because Jack here was just wondering why the crazy lady who just spent the last hour chain-smoking and talking on her cell phone while her kid ate sand, would come over to two complete strangers and give them parenting advice.
    Jordan: Oh, he also thanked me for not naming him Brantley.
    Dr. Cox: Yeah.

  3. Dr. Cox: Honestly, I haven’t been this happy since Christmas when I was seven years old and my father showed me how to make a snow angel. Actually, he was passed out drunk in the yard… But I did take his arms and his legs and move them back and forth… And… th-the paramedics said it was one of the finest snow angels that they’d ever seen. So, maybe the fact that I am the kinder, gentler Cox is every last bit of okay. Maybe it’s a… a natural progression. It’s not like there’s any real ramifications…
    [laughs]

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